Home Home DécorHome Improvement Hydrangea is a wonderful plant with luxurious flowers. It loves to “eat”.

Hydrangea is a wonderful plant with luxurious flowers. It loves to “eat”.

And now you will be surprised, most of all she loves kefir. Unusual, isn't it? Now let's look at all the unconventional feeding for this plant.

by MagDIGIT
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Kefir

Literally all varieties of hydrangea love this drink. It contains lactic acid bacteria, this plant loves them very much. Fermented baked milk is also included in this category. In a 10-liter bucket, 2 liters of kefir are diluted, poured strictly at the root. Before feeding, you need to spill the bush with water in the amount of 1 bucket.

Citric acid and apple cider vinegar

Hydrangea loves acidified soil, it will not grow normally in a neutral and alkaline environment. Therefore, apple cider vinegar is used for acidification (100 g per bucket of water). If you use citric acid for feeding, you will need 2 tbsp. tablespoons for 10 water (pre-dissolve the substance in a small container, and then pour into a bucket). You need to water the entire growing season with an interval of 15-20 days.

Potassium permanganate

What is hydrangea for? Potassium permanganate is rich in potassium, which strengthens the shoots, makes the flower stalks more luxuriant, and makes the stems flexible. They will not break in strong gusts of wind. In addition, potassium permanganate kills pathogenic bacteria in the soil. During the season, the plant is watered with this agent 3-4 times. How to dilute? A slightly pink solution is suitable, in which you need to stir the crystals well, otherwise the undissolved potassium permanganate will burn the roots of the plant. You don’t have to make it strong. One bush requires 1 bucket with dissolved potassium permanganate. First, the soil must be shed with clean water.

Bread crusts

You can feed the hydrangea with an acidic solution made from bread crusts. Simply place bread crusts in warm water until the solution ferments.

All the best to you!

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